A guide to carbon monoxide...

Carbon monoxide levels in the air
What is normal? What is dangerous?

Carbon monoxide levels in the blood stream cannot easily be measured outside a medical setting. Carbon monoxide levels are often shown as concentration levels of parts per million (PPM) in the air and length of exposure.


Carbon monoxide
Parts Per Million
(
PPM)
Time Symptoms
0.2 PPM - Natural carbon monoxide levels in the air
35 PPM 8 hours Maximum exposure of carbon monoxide levels allowed by
OSHA in the workplace over an 8
hour period
200 PPM 2 to 3 hours Mild headache, fatigue, nausea
dizziness
400 PPM 1 to 2 hours Serious carbon monoxide headache, other symptoms intensify
Continued exposure: Life threatening after 3 hours
800 PPM 45 minutes

Dizziness, nausea, convulsions
Unconscious within 2 hours
Continued exposure: Death within 2 to 3 hours

1,600 PPM 20 minutes Headache, dizziness, nausea
Continued exposure: Death within 1 hour
3,200 PPM 5 to 10 minutes Headache, dizziness, nausea
Continued exposure: Death within 1 hour
6,400 PPM 1 to 2 minutes Headache, dizziness, nausea
Continued exposure: Death within 25 to 30 minutes
12,800 PPM 1 to 3 minutes Death

Carbon monoxide levels - how much is too much?

Carbon monoxide levels can vary widely within an enclosed or semi-enclosed area such as a bedroom, office, garage, work shop, etc.

Carbon monoxide levels can also fluctuate enormously over a short period of time as conditions change. For example when a door is opened, a window is closed, a furnace turns on, or air flows due to breeze.

Carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms vary widely from person to person.

A person with relatively low carbon monoxide levels and mild symptoms can actually be seriously poisoned. Many factors play a role in the severity of symptoms while in the body, short term symptoms and effects, long term effects, and the damage caused by carbon monoxide poisoning.

Your comments about carbon monoxide poisoning...

FacebookTwitterDiggDeliciousRedditStumbleuponYahoo My WebGoogle Bookmarks
Questions? Want to share your opinion? Do it here...
Never presume a beeping CO alarm is defective
FP from Massachusetts, USA
I am a renter. Massachusetts requires landlords to provide CO detector alarms in all rental units that use a fuel for heating, cooking, or appliances. My unit\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s heat is fueled by natural gas.

Last night, the CO alarm started beeping. I almost ignored it. It was nearly midnight and I was tired. 3 weeks earlier, I called the fire department for a beeping CO alarm, but no gas was detected. I asked my landlord to replace the defective alarm. Now, this unit, too, was beeping. I had turned on the heat 2 hours earlier.

This time, the fire chief\\\'s equipment detected 45 ppm CO. He located blockage. The utility company shut off the gas. Today, plumbers disassembled, cleaned, and repaired the system. It was long over due.

Do not be embarrassed to call the fire department. CO is tasteless, odorless, and at low levels of exposure, the symptoms are hard to identify. Was I groggy because I was sleepy or because I had been breathing CO?




Never presume a beeping CO alarm is defective
FP from Massachusetts, USA
I am a renter. Massachusetts requires landlords to provide CO detector alarms in all rental units that use a fuel for heating, cooking, or appliances. My unit\'s heat is fueled by natural gas.

Last night, the CO alarm started beeping. I almost ignored it. It was nearly midnight and I was tired. 3 weeks earlier, I called the fire department for a beeping CO alarm, but no gas was detected. I asked my landlord to replace the defective alarm. Now, this unit was beeping just 2 hours after I turned on the heat.

This time, the fire chief\'s equipment detected 45 ppm CO. He located blockage. The utility company shut off the gas. Today, plumbers disassembled, cleaned, and repaired the system. It was long over due.

Don\'t be embarrassed to call the fire department. CO is tasteless, odorless, and at low levels of exposure, the symptoms are hard to identify. Was I groggy because I was sleepy or because I had been breathing CO?




CO in cigarette smoke
Brian from UK
I've seen figures of 30,000 to 40,000 ppm quoted for a drag on a cigarette- how does this square with the figure of 12,800 ppm being lethal within 1-3 minutes? I've no intention of starting to smoke.....

Brain shrinkage (atrophy)
CO Survivor
A number of survivors of multiple low level poisonings have reported to us that they had mri's that showed brain atrophy.

Damage to Cerebellum
DSchneider from Miami, FL USA
Can CO poisoning cause the Cerebellum to atrophy. Hubby probably had some low level, long term exposure. MRIs show his Cerellum has atrophied. Can there be a connection? There are also symptoms in other areas of the brain.

Sara from Sweden
How much carbon monoxide is in the air today?

Questions? Want to share your opinion? Do it here...
FacebookTwitterDiggDeliciousRedditStumbleuponYahoo My WebGoogle Bookmarks

 

Return to About carbon monoxide or top of Carbon monoxide levels in the air: What is normal? What is dangerous?




Exposed recently?
Learn more

Join the
recovery support
program

Easy ways you can
make a difference

Audio interviews
with experts

BSF: a natural
option?

Revealing the
invisible iceberg?

CO linked to
common disorders

Carbon Monoxide
Survivor